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The Australian Undergraduate Economics Degree: Results from a Survey of Students

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Author Info

  • Siegfried, John J
  • Round, David K

Abstract

This article reports the results of a large survey of Australian undergraduate economics students. The students were queried about their sociodemographic characteristics, reasons for selecting a university economics degree, university experience in learning economics, assessment of their university economics programs, and future education and career plans. They also assigned themselves expected grades on hypothetical examination questions in macroeconomics, macroeconomics, and economic statistics. The students rated their lectures and the rigor of their curriculum as the strengths of their degree. They were most disappointed about their training in writing essays, the course advising they received, and their instruction in problem solving. Copyright 1994 by The Economic Society of Australia.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

Volume (Year): 70 (1994)
Issue (Month): 209 (June)
Pages: 192-203

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:70:y:1994:i:209:p:192-203

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Cited by:
  1. Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don Webber, 2014. "Why do Students Study Economics?," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 119-147, March.
    • Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don J. Webber, 2013. "Why do students study economics?," Working Papers 20131303, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  2. Elias Katsikas, 2009. "Elements and Symptoms of a Poor Higher Education system: Evidence from a Greek University," Discussion Paper Series 2009_17, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised Dec 2009.
  3. Cheah, L.L. & Stokes, A.R. & Wilson, E.J., 1999. "WinEcon Fiscal Pathways: A Computer Based Learning Module for the Subject Macroeconomic Theory and Policy," Economics Working Papers WP99-14, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
  4. Alauddin, Mohammad & Valadkhani, Abbas, 2003. "Causes and Implications of Declining Economics Major: A Focus on Australia," MPRA Paper 50393, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Tang, Tommy, 2003. "Understanding Students' Misunderstanding in Economics," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 33(1), pages 157-171, March.

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