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Can Soft Drink Taxes Reduce Population Weight?

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  • JASON M. FLETCHER
  • DAVID FRISVOLD
  • NATHAN TEFFT

Abstract

"Soft drink consumption has been hypothesized as one of the major factors in the growing rates of obesity in the United States. Nearly two-thirds of all states currently tax soft drinks using excise taxes, sales taxes, or special exceptions to food exemptions from sales taxes to reduce consumption of this product, raise revenue, and improve public health. In this paper, we evaluate the impact of changes in state soft drink taxes on body mass index (BMI), obesity, and overweight. Our results suggest that soft drink taxes influence BMI, but that the impact is small in magnitude."("JEL" I18, H75) Copyright Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Contemporary Economic Policy.

Volume (Year): 28 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (01)
Pages: 23-35

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Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:28:y:2010:i:1:p:23-35

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Cited by:
  1. Georgia S. Papoutsi & Rodolfo M. Nayga & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Andreas C. Drichoutis, 2013. "Nudging parental health behavior with and without children's pestering power: Fat tax, subsidy or both?," Working Papers 2013-5, Agricultural University of Athens, Department Of Agricultural Economics.
  2. Guy E.J. Faulkner & Paul Grootendorst & Van Hai Nguyen & Tatiana Andreyeva & Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos & Chris Auld & Sean B. Cash & John Cawley & Peter Donnelly & Adam Drewnowski & Laurette Dubé & R, 2011. "Economic Instruments for Obesity Prevention: Results of a Scoping Review and Modified Delphi Survey," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 31-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  3. Liu, Yizao & Lopez, Rigoberto A. & Zhu, Chen, 2014. "The Impact of Four Alternative Policies to Decrease Soda Consumption," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 43(1), April.
  4. Cawley, John & Meyerhoefer, Chad, 2012. "The medical care costs of obesity: An instrumental variables approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 219-230.
  5. Ljungvall, Åsa & Gerdtham, Ulf-G & Lindblad, Ulf, 2012. "Misreporting and Misclassification: Implications for Socioeconomic Disparities in Body-mass Index and Obesity," Working Papers 2012:19, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  6. McGeary, Kerry Anne, 2013. "The impact of state-level nutrition-education program funding on BMI: Evidence from the behavioral risk factor surveillance system," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 67-78.
  7. Fletcher, Jason M. & Frisvold, David E. & Tefft, Nathan, 2010. "The effects of soft drink taxes on child and adolescent consumption and weight outcomes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 967-974, December.
  8. Yizao Liu & Rigoberto A. Lopez & Chen Zhu, 2013. "How Effective is Public Policy in Decreasing Soda Consumption? An Assessment of Four Policy Options," Working Papers 19, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
  9. Kerry Anne McGeary, 2009. "The Impact of State-Level Nutrition-Education Program Funding on BMI: Evidence from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," NBER Working Papers 15001, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Colantuoni, Francesca & Rojas, Christian, 2012. "Have soda sales tax effects changed over time? Scanner data comparison analyses," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124806, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  11. Colantuoni, Francesca & Rojas, Christian, 2013. "Heterogeneous behavior, obesity and storability in soft drink consumption: A dynamic demand model," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150340, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  12. Lordan Grace & Quiggin John, 2011. "Should We Put a Thin Subsidy on the Policy Table in the Fight against Obesity?," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(2), pages 1-13, March.

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