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How Financial Literacy Affects Household Wealth Accumulation

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Author Info

  • Jere R. Behrman
  • Olivia S. Mitchell
  • Cindy K. Soo
  • David Bravo

Abstract

This study isolates the causal effects of financial literacy and schooling on wealth accumulation using a new household dataset and an instrumental variables (IV) approach. Financial literacy and schooling attainment are both strongly positively associated with wealth outcomes in linear regression models, whereas the IV estimates reveal even more potent effects of financial literacy. They also indicate that the schooling effect only becomes positive when interacted with financial literacy. Estimated impacts are substantial enough to imply that investments in financial literacy could have large wealth payoffs.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.300
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 102 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 300-304

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:300-304

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References

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  1. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2008. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," CeRP Working Papers 72, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  2. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2006. "Baby Boomer Retirement Security: The Roles of Planning, Financial Literacy, and Housing Wealth," CeRP Working Papers 54, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
  3. Justine Hastings & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2010. "How Financial Literacy and Impatience Shape Retirement Wealth and Investment Behaviors," Working Papers wp233, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  4. Behrman, Jere R & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Taubman, Paul, 1994. "Endowments and the Allocation of Schooling in the Family and in the Marriage Market: The Twins Experiment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1131-74, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Dick, Christian D. & Jaroszek, Lena M., 2013. "Knowing what not to do: Financial literacy and consumer credit choices," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-027, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  2. Miller, Margaret & Reichelstein, Julia & Salas, Christian & Zia, Bilal, 2014. "Can you help someone become financially capable ? a meta-analysis of the literature," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6745, The World Bank.
  3. John V. Duca & Anil Kumar, 2011. "Financial literacy and mortgage equity withdrawals," Working Papers 1110, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  4. Luigi Guiso & Eliana Viviano, 2013. "How Much Can Financial Literacy Help?," EIEF Working Papers Series 1325, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Sep 2013.

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