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Induced Transnational Preference Change: Fukushima and Nuclear Power in Europe


  • Heinz Welsch

    () (University of Oldenburg, Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre & ZenTra)

  • Philipp Biermann

    (University of Oldenburg, Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre)


We test whether the relationship between subjective well-being (SWB) of European citizens and the structure of electricity supply has changed after the Fukushima nuclear accident of March 11, 2011. Survey data for about 124,000 individuals in 23 European countries reveal that while European citizens’ SWB was statistically unrelated to the share of nuclear power before the Fukushima disaster, it was negatively related to the nuclear share after the disaster. Taking the relationship between SWB and the electricity supply structure as an indicator of preference, this suggests the existence of an induced transnational preference change.

Suggested Citation

  • Heinz Welsch & Philipp Biermann, 2013. "Induced Transnational Preference Change: Fukushima and Nuclear Power in Europe," ZenTra Working Papers in Transnational Studies 27 / 2014, ZenTra - Center for Transnational Studies, revised Jan 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:zen:wpaper:27

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    transnational preference change; subjective well-being; nuclear power; Fukushima;

    JEL classification:

    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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