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Computer Use and the Employment Status of Older Workers: An analysis Based on Individual Data


  • Schleife, Katrin


This paper analyzes the determinants of computer use by male employees and estimates the impact of computer use on the employment status for older workers, based on individual data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP). In line with previous research on the diffusion of new technologies, a strong and negative relationship between the age of workers and computer use is found. The correlation of educational level and occupational status on computer use is significantly positive. However, the estimated impact of computer use on the change in employment status of older workers becomes insignificant when controlling for individual and firm-specific characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Schleife, Katrin, 2005. "Computer Use and the Employment Status of Older Workers: An analysis Based on Individual Data," ZEW Discussion Papers 04-62 [rev.], ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:7182

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fitzenberger, Bernd, 1998. "The moving blocks bootstrap and robust inference for linear least squares and quantile regressions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 235-287, February.
    2. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
    3. Jose A. F. Machado & Jose Mata, 2000. "Box-Cox quantile regression and the distribution of firm sizes," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(3), pages 253-274.
    4. Koenker, Roger & Park, Beum J., 1996. "An interior point algorithm for nonlinear quantile regression," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 265-283.
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    More about this item


    computer use; older workers; employment status;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes


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