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Efficient Bargaining in a Dynamic Macroeconomic Model

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  • Claas, Oliver
  • Böhm, Volker

Abstract

This paper analyzes the implications of bilateral bargaining over wages and employment between a producer and a union representing a finite number of identical workers in a monetary macroeconomic model of the AS AD type with government activity. Wages and aggregate employment levels are set according to an efficient (Nash) bargaining agreement while the commodity market is cleared in a competitive way. It is shown that, for each level of union power, measured by the share it obtains of the total production surplus, efficient bargaining implies no efficiency loss in production. However, due to the price feedback from the commodity market and to income-induced demand effects, all temporary equilibria with a positive labor share are not Nash bargaining-efficient with respect to the set of feasible temporary equilibrium allocations. The dynamic evolution of money balances, prices, and wages is analyzed being driven primarily by government budget deficits and expectations by consumers. It is shown that for each fixed level of union power, the features of the dynamics under perfect foresight are structurally identical to those of the same economy under competitive wage and price setting, i.e. for small levels of government demand, there exist two balanced paths generically, one of which with high employment and production is always unstable while the other one may be stable or unstable.

Suggested Citation

  • Claas, Oliver & Böhm, Volker, 2013. "Efficient Bargaining in a Dynamic Macroeconomic Model," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79880, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79880
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation

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