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Testing multidimensional keys of development: governance, entrepreneurship and social cohesion


  • Silvia Fernandes



This paper intends to contribute to an on-going change of perspective in territorial policies, more focused on a place-based integrative development strategy, which can be enhanced by social capital. This includes organizational and institutional learning for knowledge and skills' transfer and governance coordination of the layers involved. Several concepts and indicators can be combined to support a conceptual framework for governance redefinition and sustainable growth. A comparison with related quantitative and qualitative indicators across countries highlights an approach for building a common culture that could facilitate governance and growth sustainability. It is less the size or the level of economic development that explains the different performances across countries/regions, than their levels of capital endowment (social, institutional, cultural) and the ability to properly exploit it. The most intangible aspects (entrepreneurship, participation, cohesiveness) are key elements in making the difference through the creation, valuation and maintenance of distinctive places and communities. Key-words: governance, social capital, institutional learning, sustainable growth, indicators, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis

Suggested Citation

  • Silvia Fernandes, 2011. "Testing multidimensional keys of development: governance, entrepreneurship and social cohesion," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1431, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p1431

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Ronald L. Moomaw, 1981. "Productivity and City Size: A Critique of the Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-688.
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    7. Nakamura, Ryohei, 1985. "Agglomeration economies in urban manufacturing industries: A case of Japanese cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 108-124, January.
    8. Wagner, Alfred, 1891. "Marshall's Principles of Economics," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 5, pages 319-338.
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