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Technical Change, Productivity and Economic Growth

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  • George Korres

    ()

  • Theodoros Iosifides

    ()

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between productivity and technological change. The question that we shall address in this paper, is whether the recent slow down in productivity can be explained by the slow-down of innovation activities. This paper measures technical change through the application of a production function, and the Malqiust index in order to measure the effects of economic growth for European member states. It introduces the reader, first, to some basic elements and concepts that are central to understanding the approach. The characteristics of the innovation process are examined: its nature, sources and some of the factors shaping its development. Particular emphasis is laid on the role of technical change and dissemination based on the fundamental distinction between codified and tacit forms. These concepts recur throughout the paper and particularly in discussions on the nature and specifications of the systems approach. The paper concludes by summarizing some of the major findings of the discussion and pointing to some directions for future research activities.

Suggested Citation

  • George Korres & Theodoros Iosifides, 2003. "Technical Change, Productivity and Economic Growth," ERSA conference papers ersa03p98, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa03p98
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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa03/cdrom/papers/98.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David Devins & Alison Darlow & Vikki Smith, 2002. "Lifelong Learning and Digital Exclusion: Lessons from the Evaluation of an ICT Learning Centre and an Emerging Research Agenda," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 941-945.
    2. Bryden, John & Bollman, Ray, 2000. "Rural employment in industrialised countries," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, pages 185-197.
    3. Ronald Mcquaid, 2002. "Entrepreneurship and ICT Industries: Support from Regional and Local Policies," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(8), pages 909-919.
    4. Ramírez, Ricardo, 2001. "A model for rural and remote information and communication technologies: a Canadian exploration," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, pages 315-330.
    5. Bryden, John Marshall & Bollman, Ray D., 2000. "Rural employment in industrialised countries," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(2), March.
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