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A history of the social development network in The World Bank, 1973 - 2003


  • Davis, Gloria


The paper is intended to provide an orientation to the past and present work of the Social Development network and a contribution to its future strategy. It presents a brief overview of the history of the Social Development network or family; it illustrates both continuity and change in the way it does its work; and it provides examples of what the network has done. It does so with the assumption that knowing what we have done, and done well, will help us define our comparative advantage and make better choices about future directions. Over the past fifty years a great deal has been done to understand what makes development technically, economically and environmentally sustainable. In the end, the sustainability and success of development depends on people. Making this point, demonstrating that it matters, and operationalizing its implications, will be at the core of the Bank's future work on poverty reduction, social integration and sustainable development. Finally, recent critiques of social development initiatives are not covered in this report, as they are currently being drawn together in other reports.

Suggested Citation

  • Davis, Gloria, 2004. "A history of the social development network in The World Bank, 1973 - 2003," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 31618, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:31618

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. van de Walle, Dominique, 1994. "The Distribution of Subsidies through Public Health Services in Indonesia, 1978-87," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 279-309, May.
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    10. Ferreira, Francisco & Prennushi, Giovanna & Ravallion, Martin, 1999. "Protecting the poor from macroeconomic shocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2160, The World Bank.
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    13. De Donder, Philippe & Hindriks, Jean, 1998. "The Political Economy of Targeting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 95(1-2), pages 177-200, April.
    14. Cox, Donald, 1987. "Motives for Private Income Transfers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 508-546, June.
    15. Diamond, Peter & Sheshinski, Eytan, 1995. "Economic aspects of optimal disability benefits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 1-23, May.
    16. Sumarto, Sudarno & Suryahadi, Asep & Pritchett, Lant, 2000. "Safety nets and safety ropes - who benefited from two Indonesian crisis programs - the"poor"or the"shocked"?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2436, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. de Haan, Arjan & Foa, Roberto, 2014. "Indices of social development and their application to Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 132, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).


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