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New Zealand Outdoor Recreation Benefits

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Abstract

Millions of people participate in outdoor recreation activities in New Zealand every year. Economic recreation studies in the country concentrate mostly on market values. Market values only present part of the outdoor recreation benefit; while non-market values represent the other part. In this study, a meta-analysis is used to determine the non-market benefit of recreation. Results show non-market benefits from outdoor recreation to be over five billion dollars annually, exceeding market benefits of approximately four billion. New Zealand non-market values were then compared to those from a United States recreation database and results were favourably similar.

Suggested Citation

  • Pamela Kaval & Richard Yao, 2007. "New Zealand Outdoor Recreation Benefits," Working Papers in Economics 07/14, University of Waikato.
  • Handle: RePEc:wai:econwp:07/14
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    Keywords

    non-market valuation; outdoor recreation; consumer surplus; New Zealand;

    JEL classification:

    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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