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The U.S. Employment Effects of Military and Domestic Spending Priorities: An Updated Analysis


  • Robert Pollin
  • Heidi Garrett-Peltier


In this study, produced in collaboration with the Institute for Policy Studies, Robert Pollin and Heidi Garrett-Peltier update their earlier analysis of the relative employment impacts of public investment in military versus other priorities, expanding their analysis to include clean energy investments and induced job creation. The authors compare the effects of a $1 billion military investment military and the same investment in clean energy, health care, education, or individual tax cuts. They show that non-military investments create a much larger number of jobs across all pay ranges. With a large share of the federal budget at stake, Pollin and Garrett-Peltier make a strong case that non-military spending priorities can create significantly greater opportunities for decent employment throughout the U.S. economy than spending the same amount of funds with the military. >> Women's Action for New Directions and the Institute for Policy Studies have produced a short fact sheet based on the findings from this report.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Pollin & Heidi Garrett-Peltier, 2010. "The U.S. Employment Effects of Military and Domestic Spending Priorities: An Updated Analysis," Published Studies spending_priorities_peri, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:perips:spending_priorities_peri

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