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Trade and jobs in Europe: much ado about nothing?

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  • André Sapir
  • Mathias Dewatripont
  • Khalid Sekkat

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • André Sapir & Mathias Dewatripont & Khalid Sekkat, 1999. "Trade and jobs in Europe: much ado about nothing?," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/8076, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulb:ulbeco:2013/8076
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Ansolabehere & John M. de Figueiredo & James M. Snyder, 2003. "Why Is There So Little Money in Politics?," NBER Working Papers 9409, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Potters, Jan & Sloof, Randolph & van Winden, Frans, 1997. "Campaign expenditures, contributions and direct endorsements: The strategic use of information and money to influence voter behavior," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-31, February.
    3. Weingast, Barry R. & Wittman, Donald, 2008. "The Oxford Handbook of Political Economy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199548477.
    4. Andrea Prat, 2002. "Campaign Advertising and Voter Welfare," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 999-1017.
    5. Prat, Andrea, 2002. "Campaign Spending with Office-Seeking Politicians, Rational Voters, and Multiple Lobbies," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 162-189, March.
    6. Stephen Coate, 2004. "Pareto-Improving Campaign Finance Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 628-655, June.
    7. Stephen Ansolabehere & John M. de Figueiredo & James M. Snyder Jr, 2003. "Why is There so Little Money in U.S. Politics?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 105-130, Winter.
    8. Steven D. Levitt, 1995. "Policy Watch: Congressional Campaign Finance Reform," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(1), pages 183-193, Winter.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bianconi, Marcelo & Fisher, Walter H., 2005. "Intertemporal budget policies and macroeconomic adjustment in a small open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, pages 1-17.
    2. Willem Molle, 2002. "Globalization, Regionalism and Labour Markets: Should We Recast the Foundations of the EU Regime in Matters of Regional (Rural and Urban) Development?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 161-172.
    3. Thierry Verdier, 2005. "Intégration commerciale « socialement responsable » : une approche en termes d'économie politique," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, pages 55-121.
    4. Novella Bottini & Michael Gasiorek, 2009. "Trade and Job Reallocation: Evidence for Morocco," Working Papers 492, Economic Research Forum, revised Jun 2009.
    5. Robert Stehrer, 2004. "Can Trade Explain the Sector Bias of Skill-biased Technical Change?," wiiw Working Papers 30, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    6. Dumont, Michel, 2004. "The Impact of International Trade with Newly Industrialised Countries on the Wages and Employment of Low-Skilled and High-Skilled Workers in the European Union," MPRA Paper 83525, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Sapir, André, 2000. "Who is Afraid of Globalization? The Challenge of Domestic Adjustment in Europe and America," CEPR Discussion Papers 2595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Michael W. Klein & Scott Schuh & Robert K. Triest, 2002. "Job creation, job destruction, and international competition: a literature review," Working Papers 02-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    9. Lahcen ACHY & Khalid SEKKAT, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Employment in the Moroccan Manufacturing Sector," International Trade 0512011, EconWPA.
    10. Jolanda Peeters & Albert de Vaal, 2003. "Explaining the Wage Gap: Intra-Industry Trade, Services Linkages and Falling Transportation Costs," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(3), pages 251-280, December.
    11. Peter Huber & Yvonne Wolfmayr-Schnitzer, 2000. "Foreign Trade and Wages," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 73(3), pages 197-210, March.
    12. Helmut Hofer & Peter Huber, 2003. "Wage and Mobility Effects of Trade and Migration on the Austrian Labour Market," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 107-125, June.

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