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Seguridad social y género en Uruguay: un análisis de las diferencias de acceso a la jubilación

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Listed:
  • Marisa Bucheli

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Alvaro Forteza

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Ianina Rossi

    () (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

In Uruguay, the pension programs cover over 90% of the elderly. Men are more likely to be eligible for the contributory pensions, while women are over-represented in the assistential and survivor pension programs. This difference is linked to the fact that women tend to have longer spells out of the labour force than men. In this context, we analyze the difference in contributory pension access between men and women. First, we present the gender labor market and demographic differences. Second, we document the social security reform implemented in 1996. Lastly, we estimate the probability of complying with the requirements to access a contributory pension. Although the punctual estimations have certain limitations, they suggest that there are gender differences in access.

Suggested Citation

  • Marisa Bucheli & Alvaro Forteza & Ianina Rossi, 2006. "Seguridad social y género en Uruguay: un análisis de las diferencias de acceso a la jubilación," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0406, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:0406
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marisa Bucheli & Rodrigo Ceni, 2010. "Informality Sectoral Selection and Earnings in Uruguay," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 25(2), pages 281-307.
    2. -, 2010. "Social Panorama of Latin America 2009," Panorama Social de América Latina, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1249 edited by Eclac.
    3. -, 2016. "Hacia un desarrollo inclusivo: el caso del Uruguay," Coediciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 40494 edited by Cepal.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    pensions; access conditions; retirement; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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