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Concave Consumption Function under Borrowing

Author

Listed:
  • Richard M. H. Suen

    () (Department of Economics, University of California Riverside)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the optimal consumption behavior of a consumer who faces uninsurable labor income risk and borrowing constraints. In particular, it provides conditions under which the decision rule for consumption is a concave function of existing assets. The current study presents two main Öndings. First, it is shown that the consumption function is concave if the period utility function is drawn from the HARA class and has either strictly positive or zero third derivative. Second, it is shown that the same result can be obtained for certain period utility functions that are not in the HARA class.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard M. H. Suen, 2010. "Concave Consumption Function under Borrowing," Working Papers 201007, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucr:wpaper:201007
    as

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    File URL: http://economics.ucr.edu/repec/ucr/wpaper/10-07.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Berg, Joyce & Forsythe, Robert & Nelson, Forrest & Rietz, Thomas, 2008. "Results from a Dozen Years of Election Futures Markets Research," Handbook of Experimental Economics Results, Elsevier.
    2. Jonathan B. Hill, 2007. "Efficient tests of long-run causation in trivariate VAR processes with a rolling window study of the money-income relationship," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 747-765.
    3. Jean-Marie Dufour & Eric Renault, 1998. "Short Run and Long Run Causality in Time Series: Theory," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(5), pages 1099-1126, September.
    4. Justin Wolfers & Eric Zitzewitz, 2004. "Prediction Markets," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 107-126.
    5. Granger, C. W. J., 1980. "Testing for causality : A personal viewpoint," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 329-352, May.
    6. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    7. Georgios Tziralis & Ilias Tatsiopoulos, 2007. "Prediction Markets: An Extended Literature Review," Journal of Prediction Markets, University of Buckingham Press, vol. 1(1), pages 75-91, February.
    8. Berg, Joyce E. & Nelson, Forrest D. & Rietz, Thomas A., 2008. "Prediction market accuracy in the long run," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 285-300.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption function; borrowing constraints; precautionary saving;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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