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Introducción al estudio de la incidencia del gasto público

Se estudia la incidencia de los ingresos y gastos públicos en las diferentes regiones españolas. En lo que se refiere al gasto se utiliza dos enfoques de incidencia, según la fuente de datos empleada. Además se ofrece una segunda resultante de la imputación del gasto en presupuestos de nuestras Administraciones públicas entre las distintas regiones.

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Paper provided by Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales in its series Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales with number 98-17.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucm:doctra:98-17
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  1. Philip J. Grossman, 1988. "Government and Economic Growth: A Non-Linear Relationship," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-04, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. Randall W. Eberts & Michael S. Fogerty, 1987. "Estimating the relationship between local, public and private investment," Working Paper 8703, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  3. Peltzman, Sam, 1980. "The Growth of Government," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(2), pages 209-87, October.
  4. Randall W. Eberts, 1986. "Estimating the contribution of urban public infrastructure to regional growth," Working Paper 8610, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  5. Meltzer, Allan H & Richard, Scott F, 1981. "A Rational Theory of the Size of Government," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 89(5), pages 914-27, October.
  6. Robert Ford & Pierre Poret, 1991. "Infrastructure and Private-Sector Productivity," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 91, OECD Publishing.
  7. Isabel Argimon & Jose Gonzalez-Paramo & Jose Roldan, 1997. "Evidence of public spending crowding-out from a panel of OECD countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(8), pages 1001-1010.
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