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Economías de aglomeración y cooperación económica a las inversiones en infraestructura básica de las entidades locales

Author

Listed:
  • Álvarez, Inmaculada

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

  • Prieto, Angel

    (IRNASA-CSIC)

  • Zofío, José Luis

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Abstract

Las Entidades Locales desarrollan su gestión presupuestaria en un entorno complejo establecido por la normativa estatal, autonómica y local, y condicionada por la presión de los ciudadanos por mejores servicios públicos y los requerimientos de mayor eficiencia en el gasto provenientes de administraciones de mayor nivel. Estas últimas son las que establecen, mediante pautas emanadas de la Ley Reguladora de las Bases de Régimen Local, los programas de cooperación económica a las Entidades Locales para la provisión de infraestructura básica, y que se materializan en su stock municipal. En este artículo se discute la cooperación económica a las inversiones de las entidades locales y se estiman, mediante una función de costes translogarítmica, las economías de aglomeración (escala, alcance y densidad) en la provisión de infraestructura básica municipal, poniendo en evidencia la existencia de importantes ineficiencias derivadas de un tamaño municipal subóptimo, el cual conlleva un sobrecoste económico en la provisión. La información estadística a nivel municipal se obtiene de la Encuesta de Infraestructura y Equipamientos Locales y las Bases de Precios Paramétricos, siendo el ámbito geográfico de análisis Castilla y León.

Suggested Citation

  • Álvarez, Inmaculada & Prieto, Angel & Zofío, José Luis, 2008. "Economías de aglomeración y cooperación económica a las inversiones en infraestructura básica de las entidades locales," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2008/04, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
  • Handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:200804
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    References listed on IDEAS

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