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Agenda Setting and Reciprocal Vote Trading


  • Urs Fischbacher
  • Simeon Schudy


We study the implications of reciprocity on agenda setting in a sequential policy decision. We designed a laboratory experiment in which a committee decides sequentially on three independent bills. Selfish committee members would turn down all bills but reciprocity allows for implicit vote trading. This mechanism gives power to agenda setters. We find that agenda setters use their power when setting the agenda but are rather generous in the voting decision. Legislators benefiting from the chosen agenda support the agenda setter more frequently whereas those suffering from the chosen agenda punish the agenda setter. Nevertheless agenda setting increases efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Urs Fischbacher & Simeon Schudy, 2010. "Agenda Setting and Reciprocal Vote Trading," TWI Research Paper Series 58, Thurgauer Wirtschaftsinstitut, Universität Konstanz.
  • Handle: RePEc:twi:respas:0058

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    Cited by:

    1. Urs Fischbacher & Simeon Schudy, 2014. "Reciprocity and resistance to comprehensive reform," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(3), pages 411-428, September.


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