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Major League Duopolists: When Baseball Clubs Play in Two-Team Cities


  • Phillip Miller

    () (Department of Economics, Minnesota State University)


This paper focuses on examining the attendance of MLB teams that play home games in the same metropolitan area – duopoly teams. Comparisons were made between the determinants of attendance for duopoly teams and monopoly teams. While duopoly and monopoly teams share most of the same determinants, the estimated weights on some determinants differ. There is evidence that one duopolist’s attendance is negatively related to the other’s performance. Evidence is therefore provided that fans of one team respond to quality changes in the other team in a city.

Suggested Citation

  • Phillip Miller, 2006. "Major League Duopolists: When Baseball Clubs Play in Two-Team Cities," Working Papers 0628, International Association of Sports Economists;North American Association of Sports Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:spe:wpaper:0628

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mongeon, Kevin & Winfree, Jason, 2012. "Cross-ownership, league policies and player investment across sports leagues," MPRA Paper 39218, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kevin Mongeon & Jason Winfree, 2013. "The Effects of Cross-Ownership and League Policies Across Sports Leagues Within a City," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 43(3), pages 145-162, November.

    More about this item


    Sports; Baseball;

    JEL classification:

    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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