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Special-Interest Groups and Volatility

  • Bonnie Wilson

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Saint Louis University)

  • Dennis Coates

    ()

    (Department of Economics, University of Maryland Baltimore County)

  • Jac Heckelman

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Wake Forest University)

This paper explores the relationship between special-interest groups and volatility of GDP growth. In an unbalanced panel of 108 countries, we find a significant negative relationship between the number of interest groups in a country and the volatility of GDP growth.

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Paper provided by Saint Louis University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2007-04.

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Length: 13 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Economics Bulletin, August 21, 2007, Vol. 15, No. 18
Handle: RePEc:slu:wpaper:2007-04
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Web page: http://www.slu.edu/x14335.xml

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  1. Heckelman, Jac C, 2000. " Consistent Estimates of the Impact of Special Interest Groups on Economic Growth," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 104(3-4), pages 319-27, September.
  2. Parente, Stephen L & Prescott, Edward C, 1994. "Barriers to Technology Adoption and Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 298-321, April.
  3. Krusell, Per & Rios-Rull, Jose-Victor, 1996. "Vested Interests in a Positive Theory of Stagnation and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(2), pages 301-29, April.
  4. Herrendorf, Berthold & Teixeira, Arilton, 2003. "Monopoly Rights can Reduce Income Big Time," CEPR Discussion Papers 3854, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Stratmann, Thomas, 1998. "The Market for Congressional Votes: Is Timing of Contributions Everything?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 85-113, April.
  6. Stephen L. Parente & Edward C. Prescott, 1997. "Monopoly rights: a barrier to riches," Staff Report 236, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  7. Ahmed Mushfiq Mobarak, 2005. "Democracy, Volatility, and Economic Development," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 348-361, May.
  8. Coates, Dennis & Heckelman, Jac C, 2003. " Interest Groups and Investment: A Further Test of the Olson Hypothesis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(3-4), pages 333-40, December.
  9. Garey Ramey & Valerie A. Ramey, 1994. "Cross-Country Evidence on the Link Between Volatility and Growth," NBER Working Papers 4959, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Stratmann, Thomas, 2002. "Can Special Interests Buy Congressional Votes? Evidence from Financial Services Legislation," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 345-73, October.
  11. Kennelly, Brendan & Murrell, Peter, 1991. " Industry Characteristics and Interest Group Formation: An Empirical Study," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 70(1), pages 21-40, April.
  12. Bischoff, Ivo, 2003. " Determinants of the Increase in the Number of Interest Groups in Western Democracies: Theoretical Considerations and Evidence from 21 OECD Countries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 114(1-2), pages 197-218, January.
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