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Spatial Analysis As Tool For Sensitivity Assessment Of Sea Level Rise Impacts On Martinique

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  • Christine Schleupner

    () (Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg)

Abstract

Sea level in the Caribbean region is expected to rise approximately10-20 cm by 2025. In some areas of Martinique coastal erosion and saltwater intrusion are already a severe problem. Because the island has a mountainous character, the majority of its settlements are situated along the coast almost at sea level. Considerations and strategies for dealing with potential sea level rise and its consequences for Martinique do not exist. This part of a detailed case study concentrates on the evaluation of sea level rise impacts on Martinique. It is going to test the suitability of spatial data for impact scenarios at a regional scale. Also, it conceptualises the possible effects of sea level rise on the island for future regional planning purposes. An elevation model is created that visualises the low-lying coastal areas and a second model evaluates the sensitivity of each coastal segment to erosion, flooding and inundation. The resulting map distinguishes between coastal parts at high, medium, or low risk to sea level rise impacts. Results show that nearly three quarters of the Martinique coast are highly sensitive to flooding and erosion.

Suggested Citation

  • Christine Schleupner, 2005. "Spatial Analysis As Tool For Sensitivity Assessment Of Sea Level Rise Impacts On Martinique," Working Papers FNU-71, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised May 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:71
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Caribbean; Lesser Antilles; Regional Planning; GIS; Climate Change; Coastal Change; Erosion; Inundation;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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