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Antes y después de 1810: escenarios en la historia de las exportaciones rioplatenses de cueros desde 1760 hasta 1860


  • María-Inés Moraes


  • Natalia Stalla


This paper focus on the history of River Plate’s exports of hides from 1760 to 1860, a century that ran from the beginning of the Bourbon reforms in America until the beginning of the “first globalization”. The aim of this paper is to show some basic magnitudes of this crucial commodity in the region’s history of international trade, from the early years as a staple until its maturity. Thus, this work collects from primary and secondary sources data on volume, prices and values of exported hides from Buenos Aires and Montevideo along the period. This evidence is useful to grasp how volumes, prices and values performed before and after the critical year of 1810, when the colonial ties with Spain were broken. The results underline three main facts: first, exports of hides from the Rio de la Plata grew at a high rate before 1810 due to a large increase in volumes and in spite of flat prices. Second, they experienced a much more slowly and fluctuating growth after the independence; in spite of wars and political turmoil, this time volumes exported were even greater than before while prices declined until 1850. Third, export prices of hides notably rise in 1850, and just then they acted as the driving force upon value.

Suggested Citation

  • María-Inés Moraes & Natalia Stalla, 2011. "Antes y después de 1810: escenarios en la historia de las exportaciones rioplatenses de cueros desde 1760 hasta 1860," Documentos de Trabajo de la Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria 1110, Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria.
  • Handle: RePEc:seh:wpaper:1110

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Manuel Llorca-Jaña, 2014. "The impact of early nineteenth-century globalization on foreign trade in the Southern Cone: A study of British trade statistics," Investigaciones de Historia Económica (IHE) Journal of the Spanish Economic History Association, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica, vol. 10(01), pages 46-56.

    More about this item


    international trade; Latin America; River Plate; hides.;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • N16 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N56 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N76 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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