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The Lisbon Strategy at Midterm: Expectations and Reality


  • Urlik Butzow Mogensen
  • Patrick Lenain
  • Vicente Royuela-Mora


CASE - Center for Social and Economic Research inspired an extensive discussion on the Lisbon Strategy, its goals and objectives, successes and failures. The fervent debate, which took place in Warsaw at the end of 2004, investigated the future of the Strategy in Europe and Poland. The publication, which we are proud to present, is a result of this discussion. The Polish context for achieving the Lisbon goals was explored at a conference on December 9, 2004 entitled “The Lisbon Strategy in Poland: Directions of Necessary Reforms”. Earlier, however, answering the question whether the Lisbon objectives successfully support competitiveness in Europe was of chief concern to a group of scholars and specialists attending the conference entitled “Lisbon Strategy as an Effective Tool of Increasing Competitiveness in Europe?” (The meeting took place in Warsaw on November 8, 2004). The conference dialogue resulted in systematic and inquisitive debate on the causes of successes and failures of the Lisbon Strategy against the background of the current economy in the united Europe. The perspectives for the future implementation of the Strategy and its desired effects also proved to be of great concern. The arguments presented by the authors of the present publication continue the discussion, which has now been enriched by the contributions by conference participants.

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  • Urlik Butzow Mogensen & Patrick Lenain & Vicente Royuela-Mora, 2004. "The Lisbon Strategy at Midterm: Expectations and Reality," CASE Network Reports 0058, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:sec:cnrepo:0058

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    Cited by:

    1. Ondrej Schneider, 2007. "The EU Budget Dispute – A Blessing in Disguise?," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 57(7-8), pages 304-323, September.
    2. Ondrej Schneider, 2007. "The EU Budget Dispute – A Blessing in Disguise?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1986, CESifo Group Munich.


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