IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/sce/scecf9/541.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Sector-Driven Co-Evolution of Regional Networks and Agent Locations

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine Dibble

    () (University of California, Santa Barbara)

Abstract

The spatial economic properties of regional systems are increasingly determined not by geographic distance but by human-built networks of spatial technologies -- the networks of roads, tracks, shipping services, and communications networks that mediate our opportunities and interactions. Agents select locations in part based on the access to other agents provided by such networks. In turn, development of network infrastructure responds to agent agglomerations. This study develops agent-based computational laboratory experiments to systematically explore the co-evolution of regional networks and agent locations as a function of the proportions of economic sectors within an economy, where sectors are differentiated by the capabilities and access objectives of their constituent agents. Regional networks are modelled and studied as synthetic "Geographic SmallWorlds," building on the concept of a "small-world network" recently developed by D. Watts and S. Strogatz. Agent-based experiments explore the cumulative effects of dominant economic sectors and path-dependent co-evolution in regional networks.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Dibble, 1999. "Sector-Driven Co-Evolution of Regional Networks and Agent Locations," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 541, Society for Computational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf9:541
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bruce E. Hansen, 1999. "The Grid Bootstrap And The Autoregressive Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 594-607.
    2. Phillips, Peter C. B., 1979. "The sampling distribution of forecasts from a first-order autoregression," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 241-261, February.
    3. Albert, James H & Chib, Siddhartha, 1993. "Bayes Inference via Gibbs Sampling of Autoregressive Time Series Subject to Markov Mean and Variance Shifts," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 11(1), pages 1-15, January.
    4. Russell Davidson & James MacKinnon, 2000. "Bootstrap tests: how many bootstraps?," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 55-68.
    5. Kemp, Gordon C.R., 1999. "The Behavior Of Forecast Errors From A Nearly Integrated Ar(1) Model As Both Sample Size And Forecast Horizon Become Large," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(02), pages 238-256, April.
    6. Stock, James H., 1991. "Confidence intervals for the largest autoregressive root in U.S. macroeconomic time series," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 435-459, December.
    7. Phillips, Peter C. B., 1998. "Impulse response and forecast error variance asymptotics in nonstationary VARs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 83(1-2), pages 21-56.
    8. Andrews, Donald W K, 1993. "Exactly Median-Unbiased Estimation of First Order Autoregressive/Unit Root Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(1), pages 139-165, January.
    9. Donald W. K. Andrews & Moshe Buchinsky, 2000. "A Three-Step Method for Choosing the Number of Bootstrap Repetitions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(1), pages 23-52, January.
    10. Heimann, G√ľnter & Kreiss, Jens-Peter, 1996. "Bootstrapping general first order autoregression," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 87-98, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sce:scecf9:541. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sceeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.