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Modelling Programming Languages -- Appropriate Tools?


  • Ric D. Herbert

    () (University of Western Sydney)


This paper examines the issue of modelling languages as software tools for the construction and analysis of economic models. Modelling languages are intermediate level software tools that fit between the conventional commercial programming languages (such as C ++ and Java) and the higher level applications packages (such as specific econometric packages). They try to blend the advantages of both the higher- and lower-level tools. This paper examines these languages for use in the construction of economic models. Specifically, it examines the issue of whether such a language is the appropriate software tool for an economic modeller. It uses the modelling language Matlab together with a number of illustrative examples to examine the use of these software tools with dynamic economic models.

Suggested Citation

  • Ric D. Herbert, 1999. "Modelling Programming Languages -- Appropriate Tools?," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 1311, Society for Computational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:sce:scecf9:1311

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    References listed on IDEAS

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