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Survey Methodology: International Developments


  • Frauke Kreuter


Falling response rates and the advancement of technology have shaped the discussion in survey methodology in the last few years. Both led to a notable change in data collection efforts. Survey organizations try to create adaptive recruitment and survey designs and increased the collection of non-survey data for sampled cases. While the first strategy is an attempt to increase response rates and to save cost, the latter is part of efforts to reduce possible bias and response burden of those interviewed. To successfully implement adaptive designs and alternative data collection efforts researchers need to understand error properties of mixedmode and multiple-frame surveys. Randomized experiments might be needed to gain that knowledge. In addition close collaboration between survey organizations and researchers is needed, including the possibility and willingness to shared data between those organizations. Expanding options for graduate and post-graduate education in survey methodology might help to increase the possibility for high quality surveys.

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  • Frauke Kreuter, 2009. "Survey Methodology: International Developments," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 59, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
  • Handle: RePEc:rsw:rswwps:rswwps59

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    Cited by:

    1. Max Kaase, 2011. "EMPIRISCHE SOZIALFORSCHUNG IN DEUTSCHLAND. Entwicklungslinien, Errungenschaften und Zukunftsperspektiven," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 189, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).

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    Survey Methodology; Responsive Design; Paradata;

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