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Why should we share our data, how can it be organized, and what are the challenges ahead?


  • Denis Huschka


Empirical social sciences strongly contribute towards a better understanding of societies, especially of those societies that undergo rapid social changes. Empirical analyses are fed into the steering processes that are shaping a Europe of Nations. But data are also essential for the support of social and economic developments in national contexts. I was asked to reflect on three questions in my talk, namely: Why should we share our data? How can data sharing be organized? And what are the challenges ahead?

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  • Denis Huschka, 2013. "Why should we share our data, how can it be organized, and what are the challenges ahead?," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 216, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
  • Handle: RePEc:rsw:rswwps:rswwps216

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