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A quem beneficiam as políticas públicas no Brasil? Uma visão de longo prazo


  • Marcelo de Paiva Abreu

    () (Department of Economics, PUC-Rio)


Cui bono? A quem beneficiaram as polticas públicas no Brasil desde o Império? O artigo trata de rent creation, rent seeking, direitos de propriedade e temas correlatos em três momentos da historia econômica do Brasil: a heranca colonial, a economia cafeeira em seu auge e o primado da estratégia baseada no Estado cum autarquia desde a grande depressão de 1929-1933. Conclui com comentários sobre o Brasil atual e o árduo caminho em busca de uma relação virtuosa entre o fim da corrupção" e o aprofundamento da democracia substantiva.
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Suggested Citation

  • Marcelo de Paiva Abreu, 2007. "A quem beneficiam as políticas públicas no Brasil? Uma visão de longo prazo," Textos para discussão 554, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
  • Handle: RePEc:rio:texdis:554

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • N16 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N46 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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