IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Det tekno-økonomiske paradigmeskiftet. Konsekvenser for norske distrikts- og ressurbaserte næringer
[The Techno-Economic Paradigm Shift: Consequences for Norwegian regional and resource-based industries]

Listed author(s):
  • Reinert, Erik S.

This report, commissioned by the Norwegian Farmers' Association (Norges Bondelag) and Norway's Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development, takes a long term view of the theoretical and practical relationships between rural industries - agriculture and forestry - and urban industries, arguing that the qualitative differences between these types of activities create a need for different policy instruments in the two sectors. While agriculture operates under diminishing returns (the best land is normally used first) and perfect competition, the manufacturing industry operates under increasing returns to scale and imperfect competition. The resulting barriers to entry in manufacturing combined with frequent innovations create a dynamic imperfect competition which allows for higher wages and higher profits in manufacturing than in agriculture. It is argued that these qualitative differences were understood in the 1930s as a result of the crisis, and that allowing monopolies in the agricultural sectors (also in the United States) was a result of an understanding that agriculture needed to become "more like manufacturing" (i.e. freeing agriculture from the curse of perfect competition). In other words - as it was commonly understood well into the post-WW II period - the problems of the agricultural sector are of a kind that cannot be solved by increasing efficiency alone. Recommendations on how to make agriculture "more like manufacturing" in the present technological setting are presented.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/48150/1/MPRA_paper_48150.pdf
File Function: original version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 48150.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 1997
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:48150
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Ludwigstraße 33, D-80539 Munich, Germany

Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-2459
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-992459
Web page: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

More information through EDIRC

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:48150. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.