IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Profit Maximisation: Secular Versus Islamic


  • Hasan, Zubair


This paper argues that profit maximization of mainstream economics though unrealistic serves a useful function in price theory formation. In Islamic economics too we need it for the same purpose. Maximization per se is value neutral. What is maximized, how, and to what end are the real issue to be investigated in a case. Profit maximization from an Islamic perspective can be accommodated if all the Islamic norms of conducting business are scrupulously observed. In that case it will simply work as a pressure for attaining efficiency both in resource allocation and production. One need not throw away the baby with the bath water. The paper shows profit maximization as conducive to social well-being. under an Islamic dispensation. It would lead to a lower price, greater output, and lower risk as compared to a competitive firm under secular framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Hasan, Zubair, 1992. "Profit Maximisation: Secular Versus Islamic," MPRA Paper 2820, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:2820

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: original version
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jimenez, E. & Lockheed, M.E., 1995. "Public and Private Secondary Education in Developing Countries. A Comparative Study," World Bank - Discussion Papers 309, World Bank.
    2. Deolalikar, Anil B & Roller, Lars-Hendrik, 1989. "Patenting by Manufacturing Firms in India: Its Production and Impact," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 303-314, March.
    3. Tan, Hong & Batra, Geeta, 1997. "Technology and Firm Size-Wage Differentials in Colombia, Mexico, and Taiwan (China)," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 11(1), pages 59-83, January.
    4. Hanushek, Eric A, 1995. "Interpreting Recent Research on Schooling in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 10(2), pages 227-246, August.
    5. Kingdon, Geeta, 1996. "The Quality and Efficiency of Private and Public Education: A Case-Study of Urban India," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 57-82, February.
    6. James, Estelle & King, Elizabeth M. & Suryadi, Ace, 1996. "Finance, management, and costs of public and private schools in Indonesia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 387-398, October.
    7. Strauss, John, 1986. "Does Better Nutrition Raise Farm Productivity?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(2), pages 297-320, April.
    8. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1991. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 503-530.
    9. Evenson, Robert E. & Westphal, Larry E., 1995. "Technological change and technology strategy," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 37, pages 2209-2299 Elsevier.
    10. Colclough, Christopher, 1996. "Education and the market: Which parts of the neoliberal solution are correct?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 589-610, April.
    11. Moock, Peter R. & Leslie, Joanne, 1986. "Childhood malnutrition and schooling in the Terai region of Nepal," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 33-52.
    12. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1996. "Technical Change and Human-Capital Returns and Investments: Evidence from the Green Revolution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 931-953, September.
    13. Lee, Jaymin, 1996. "Technology imports and R&D efforts of Korean manufacturing firms," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 197-210, June.
    14. Behrman, Jere R., 1996. "Measuring the effectiveness of schooling policies in developing countries: Revisiting issues of methodology," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 345-364, October.
    15. Jamison, Dean T., 1986. "Child malnutrition and school performance in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 299-309, March.
    16. Khan, Haider A. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1989. "Macroeconomic effects of technology choice: Multiplier and structural path analysis within a SAM framework," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 131-156.
    17. Psacharopoulos, George, 1996. "Public spending on higher education in developing countries: Too much rather than too little," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 421-422, October.
    18. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    19. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Where has all the education gone?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1581, The World Bank.
    20. Alderman, Harold, et al, 1996. "The Returns to Endogenous Human Capital in Pakistan's Rural Wage Labour Market," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(1), pages 29-55, February.
    21. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1157-1173, December.
    22. Pritchett, Lant & Filmer,Deon, 1997. "What educational production functions really show : a positive theory of education spending," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1795, The World Bank.
    23. Birdsall, Nancy, 1996. "Public spending on higher education in developing countries: Too much or too little?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 407-419, October.
    24. Michael Spence, 1976. "Competition in Salaries, Credentials, and Signaling Prerequisites for Jobs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 90(1), pages 51-74.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Aydin, Necati, 2013. "Redefining Islamic Economics as a New Economic Paradigm," Islamic Economic Studies, The Islamic Research and Training Institute (IRTI), vol. 21, pages 1-34.
    2. Hasan, Zubair, 2008. "Markets and the role of government in an economy from Islamic perspective," MPRA Paper 12233, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Tarik AKIN & Abbas MIRAKHOR, 2016. "Efficiency with Rule-Compliance: A Contribution to the Theory of the Firm in Islamic Economics," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 560-574, September.

    More about this item


    Profit maximization;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:2820. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Joachim Winter). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.