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Interpersonal communication pattern of farmers through key communicators regarding some selected Gram Panchayat activities


  • Goswami, Rupak
  • Sarkar, Ashutosh


Devolution of power to the grassroot organisations has increasingly been supported in recent years within the context of participatory development. The role of interpersonal communication to actualise such development has also become an area of fresh enquiry. To explore the pattern of interpersonal communication regarding the functioning of panchayati raj institutions (PRI), hence, was taken up for the present study. Key communicator network of farmers was studied as neighbourhood, friendship and discussion group pattern to explore farmers’ interpersonal communication pattern regarding PRI activities. Sociometric technique was employed to identify the key communicators and their networks. Neighbourhood pattern of interaction showed least dense key communicator network and least dependence of farmers on these key communicators for securing information. Friendship pattern of interaction featured higher number of respondents seeking information from more than one key communicator; whereas, discussion group pattern of interaction showed least number of key communicators and highest inter-key communicator interaction. These networks can be fruitfully used to identify and facilitate information flow regarding PRI functioning; at the same time capacity building of key communicators can contribute towards the smooth functioning of these grassroot organisations.

Suggested Citation

  • Goswami, Rupak & Sarkar, Ashutosh, 2009. "Interpersonal communication pattern of farmers through key communicators regarding some selected Gram Panchayat activities," MPRA Paper 25983, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25983

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    More about this item


    Panchayati Raj Institutions; interpersonal communication; key communicator; key communicator network;

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation


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