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Romanian specifics within the framework of regional economic cooperation


  • Grigorescu, Adriana
  • Bob, Constantin


The various forms of economic cooperation are so many channels for the Romanian economy to connect itself to European and International Economy. That is why, by making use of R&D (Research & Development) cooperation mechanisms, Romania could access - even in times of transition but with the help of its national highly qualified labor force - peak technology sectors. By developing production capacities in cooperation with companies from the European Union, Romania’s affordable (cheap) labor, natural resources, commercial facilities could be driven to the technology of the third millennium. Cooperation with regard to marketing and sales is leading to the integration of the Romanian market into the European one, increasing the awareness of market requests and improving negotiation skills. High technology, new technique, trade under the auspices of international competition are steering the capitalization and management of natural, human, financial and information resources, facilitating both the integration processes and the economic and social development.

Suggested Citation

  • Grigorescu, Adriana & Bob, Constantin, 2007. "Romanian specifics within the framework of regional economic cooperation," MPRA Paper 25092, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25092

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2004. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3382, The World Bank.
    2. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
    3. William Carrington & Enrica Detragiache, 1998. "How Big is the Brain Drain?," IMF Working Papers 98/102, International Monetary Fund.
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    More about this item


    cooperation; technical; production; trade; development;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production


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