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Policy Games with Liquidity Constrained Consumers


  • Alice Albonico

    () (Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Pavia)

  • Lorenza Rossi

    () (Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, University of Pavia)


In the light of the recent financial crisis, we investigate the effects generated by limited asset market participation on optimal monetary and fiscal policy, where monetary and fiscal authority are independent and play strategically. We find that limited asset market participation strongly affects the optimal steady state and the optimal dynamics of the different policy regimes considered. In particular: (i) both in the long run and in short run equilibrium, a greater inflation bias is optimal than in the standard representative agent economy; (ii) in response to a markup shock, fiscal policy becomes more active as the fraction of liquidity constrained agents increases; (iii) optimal discretionary policies imply welfare losses for Ricardian, while liquidity constrained consumers experience welfare gains with respect to Ramsey.

Suggested Citation

  • Alice Albonico & Lorenza Rossi, 2011. "Policy Games with Liquidity Constrained Consumers," Quaderni di Dipartimento 138, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
  • Handle: RePEc:pav:wpaper:138

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carree, M. A. & Klomp, L. & Thurik, A. R., 2000. "Productivity convergence in OECD manufacturing industries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 337-345, March.
    2. Azariadis, Costas & Stachurski, John, 2005. "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5 Elsevier.
    3. Caselli, Francesco & Wilson, Daniel J., 2004. "Importing technology," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 1-32, January.
    4. Azariadis, Costas & Stachurski, John, 2005. "Poverty Traps," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5 Elsevier.
    5. Bloom, David E & Canning, David & Sevilla, Jaypee, 2003. "Geography and Poverty Traps," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 355-378, December.
    6. Broadberry, Stephen N., 1993. "Manufacturing and the Convergence Hypothesis: What the Long-Run Data Show," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 53(04), pages 772-795, December.
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    More about this item


    liquidity constrained consumers; optimal monetary and fiscal policy; strategic interaction; inflation bias;

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit


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