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Labor Market Discrimination in Lima, Peru: Evidence from a Field Experiment

  • Francisco Galarza

    ()

    (Departamento de Economía, Universidad del Pacífico)

  • Gustavo Yamada

    ()

    (Departamento de Economía, Universidad del Pacífico)

We analyze labor discrimination in Peru, a fast-growing country where much anecdotal evidence suggests the presence of discriminatory practices in everyday life. Using surnames (indigenous/white) as a proxy for race, we sent 4820 fictitious CVs in response to 1205 real job vacancies for professional, technical, and unskilled jobs in Lima. Overall, whites receive more callbacks than indigenous applicants, and beautiful applicants receive more callbacks than homely-looking ones. The magnitude and significance of the racial and beauty gaps in callbacks substantially vary by job category. In particular, better looks only seem to matter in getting more callbacks for professional jobs.

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Paper provided by Departamento de Economía, Universidad del Pacífico in its series Working Papers with number 14-01.

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Length: 12 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision: Dec 2011
Handle: RePEc:pai:wpaper:::14-01
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.up.edu.pe/
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  1. John List, 2004. "The nature and extent of discrimination in the marketplace: Evidence from the field," Natural Field Experiments 00299, The Field Experiments Website.
  2. Doris Weichselbaumer, 2000. "Is it sex or personality? The impact of sex-stereotypes on discrimination in applicant selection," Economics working papers 2000-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
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  9. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
  10. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-61, September.
  11. Mobius, Markus & Rosenblat, Tanya, 2010. "Why Beauty Matters," Staff General Research Papers 32112, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  12. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Jeff E. Biddle, 1993. "Beauty and the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 4518, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Steven D. Levitt, 2003. "Testing Theories of Discrimination: Evidence from "Weakest Link"," NBER Working Papers 9449, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Petra Moser, 2008. "An Empirical Test of Taste-based Discrimination Changes in Ethnic Preferences and their Effect on Admissions to the NYSE during World War I," NBER Working Papers 14003, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. James J. Heckman, 1998. "Detecting Discrimination," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 101-116, Spring.
  16. López Bóo, Florencia & Rossi, Martín A. & Urzua, Sergio, 2012. "The Labor Market Return to an Attractive Face: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 6356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  17. Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2011. "Revealing Taste-Based Discrimination in Hiring: A Correspondence Testing Experiment with Geographic Variation," IZA Discussion Papers 6153, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  18. Banerjee, Abhijit & Bertrand, Marianne & Datta, Saugato & Mullainathan, Sendhil, 2009. "Labor market discrimination in Delhi: Evidence from a field experiment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 14-27, March.
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