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Financial Independence of Local Productivity Centers (in Japanese)

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  • Kenji Iwata

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Abstract

After the Second World War, the productivity movement was spread out in Western European countries and in Japan. After that, the productivity movement was developed also in developing countries, e.g. India, and in some developed countries such as Germany and Italy until today. Japan Productivity Center (JPC) was established in 1955 and after that its local organizations were founded. So that JPC and its local organizations could have continued to exist for half a century, it is necessary for them to continually contribute to society. Its proof lies in the fact that the local organizations could be operated independently with smaller amount of financial support from JPC. I studied the current status of income and expenditure of Kansai Productivity Center (KPC), one of the local productivity centers of JPC. The result of my study clearly shows that KPC has been run with smaller amount of financial support from JPC.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenji Iwata, 2007. "Financial Independence of Local Productivity Centers (in Japanese)," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 07-01, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:0701
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity movement DLocal Productivity Center DFinancial Independence DFinancial support.;

    JEL classification:

    • N85 - Economic History - - Micro-Business History - - - Asia including Middle East
    • N95 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Asia including Middle East

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