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Reviewing Existing and Proposed Emissions Trading Systems

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  • Christina Hood

    (International Energy Agency)

Abstract

Putting a price on greenhouse gas emissions is a cornerstone policy in climate change mitigation. To this end, many countries have implemented or are developing domestic emissions trading systems. This paper reviews key design features of mandatory emissions trading systems that had been established or were under consideration in 2010, with a particular focus on implications for the energy sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Christina Hood, 2010. "Reviewing Existing and Proposed Emissions Trading Systems," IEA Energy Papers 2010/13, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ieaaaa:2010/13-en
    as

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5km4hv3mlg5c-en
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    Cited by:

    1. Stranlund, John K. & Murphy, James J. & Spraggon, John M., 2014. "Price controls and banking in emissions trading: An experimental evaluation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 71-86.
    2. Guy Meunier & Jean-Pierre Ponssard & Philippe Quirion, 2014. "Carbon Leakage and Capacity-Based Allocations. Is the EU right?," Working Papers hal-00672907, HAL.
    3. Wood, Peter John & Jotzo, Frank, 2011. "Price floors for emissions trading," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1746-1753, March.
    4. Springmann, Marco, 2012. "A look inwards: Carbon tariffs versus internal improvements in emissions-trading systems," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(S2), pages 228-239.
    5. Passey, Robert & Bailey, Ian & Twomey, Paul & MacGill, Iain, 2012. "The inevitability of ‘flotilla policies’ as complements or alternatives to flagship emissions trading schemes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 551-561.
    6. Ralf Martin & Mirabelle Mu?ls & Laure B. de Preux & Ulrich J. Wagner, 2014. "Industry Compensation under Relocation Risk: A Firm-Level Analysis of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(8), pages 2482-2508, August.
    7. Da Zhang & Marco Springmann & Valerie J. Karplus, 2016. "Equity and emissions trading in China," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 134(1), pages 131-146, January.
    8. Da Zhang & Marco Springmann & Valerie Karplus, 2016. "Equity and emissions trading in China," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 134(1), pages 131-146, January.
    9. Meunier, Guy & Ponssard, Jean-Pierre, 2014. "Capacity decisions with demand fluctuations and carbon leakage," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 436-454.
    10. Harro Asselt & Fariborz Zelli, 2014. "Connect the dots: managing the fragmentation of global climate governance," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 16(2), pages 137-155, April.
    11. Knut Rosendahl & Jon Strand, 2015. "Emissions Trading with Offset Markets and Free Quota Allocations," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 61(2), pages 243-271, June.
    12. Meunier, Guy & Ponssard, Jean-Pierre & Quirion, Philippe, 2014. "Carbon leakage and capacity-based allocations: Is the EU right?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 262-279.
    13. Stranlund, John K. & Moffitt, L. Joe, 2014. "Enforcement and price controls in emissions trading," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 20-38.
    14. repec:wsi:jeapmx:v:17:y:2015:i:02:n:s1464333215500180 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Daiken Mori, 2015. "Determination of efficient environmental policy instruments under uncertainty with the dominant firm model," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2637-2644.

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