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Right for the Job: Over-Qualified or Under-Skilled?

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  • Glenda Quintini

    (OECD)

Abstract

Ensuring a good match between skills acquired in education and on the job and those required in the labour market is essential to make the most of investments in human capital and promote strong and inclusive growth. Unfortunately, in the OECD on average, about one in four workers are over-qualified – i.e. they possess higher qualifications than those required by their job – and just over one in five are under-qualified – i.e. they possess lower qualifications than those required by their job. In addition, some socio-demographic groups are more likely than others to be over-qualified – notably, immigrants and new labour market entrants who take some time to sort themselves into appropriate jobs – or under-qualified – notably, experienced workers lacking a formal qualification for the skills acquired on the labour market…

Suggested Citation

  • Glenda Quintini, 2011. "Right for the Job: Over-Qualified or Under-Skilled?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 120, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:elsaab:120-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kg59fcz3tkd-en
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    Cited by:

    1. Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak & Maciej Lis, 2013. "Does gender matter for lifelong learning activity?," IBS Working Papers 3/2013, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    2. Marco Pecoraro, 2014. "Is There Still a Wage Penalty for Being Overeducated But Well-matched in Skills? A Panel Data Analysis of a Swiss Graduate Cohort," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(3), pages 309-337, September.
    3. Christina Boll & Julian Sebastian Leppin, 2016. "Differential Overeducation in East and West Germany: Extending Frank's Theory on Economic Returns Changes the Picture of Disadvantaged Women," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 30(4), pages 455-504, December.
    4. Sattinger, Michael & Hartog, Joop, 2013. "Nash bargaining and the wage consequences of educational mismatches," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 50-56.
    5. Seamus McGuinness & Luis Ortiz, 2016. "Skill gaps in the workplace: measurement, determinants and impacts," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 253-278, May.
    6. Aydede, Yigit & Dar, Atul A., 2015. "The Cost of Vertical Mismatch in Canadian Labour Markets: How Big is It?," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2015-13, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 07 Jul 2015.
    7. repec:eee:labeco:v:48:y:2017:i:c:p:120-143 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Kracke, Nancy & Reichelt, Malte & Vicari, Basha, 2017. "Wage losses due to overqualification: The role of formal degrees and occupational skills," IAB Discussion Paper 201710, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    9. Boll, Christina & Leppin, Julian Sebastian, 2013. "Unterwertige Beschäftigung von Akademikerinnen und Akademikern: Umfang, Ursachen, Einkommenseffekte und Beitrag zur geschlechtsspezifischen Lohnlücke," HWWI Policy Papers 75, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

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