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Learning Study: Its Origins, Operationalisation, and Implications

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  • Eric C.K. Cheng

    (Hong Kong Institute of Education)

  • Mun Ling Lo

    (Hong Kong Institute of Education)

Abstract

Learning Study is a collaborative, action-research approach to improve the effectiveness of student learning by enhancing the professional competence of teachers. This is achieved through the collaborative construction of the pedagogical content knowledge enabling them better to teach specific objects of learning. Through inquiry and authentic learning by the teachers, it takes account of students’ prior knowledge in the lesson planning and so creates an authentic learning environment for the students. This paper explains how the Learning Study approach relates to the set of approaches known as “Lesson Study” and how it incorporates the principles for high quality learning proposed by the OECD project on Innovative Learning Environments (ILE) in its design and implementation. It examines how Learning Study helps to integrate the factors comprising innovative learning environments. It analyses the critical conditions that support its development and practice in schools and in professional learning networks and education systems in general. L’étude sur l’apprentissage est un travail de recherche-action collaborative visant à améliorer l'efficacité de l’apprentissage des élèves, tout en renforçant la compétence professionnelle des enseignants. Cette étude est l'aboutissement d'une construction collaborative de la connaissance du contenu pédagogique, facilitant la transmission des objets spécifiques d'apprentissage. Grâce à un processus d'investigation et une authentique réflexion mené par les professeurs, les connaissances préalablement des élèves sont prises en compte pour la planification de leurs cours, créant ainsi un environnement d'apprentissage authentique pour les étudiants. Ce document explique par ailleurs comment l'étude sur l'apprentissage intègre, dans son design et sa mise en oeuvre, les exigences de haute qualité d'apprentissage identifiées par le projet des Environnements Pédagogiques Novateurs (ILE) de l'Organisation pour la Coopération Économique et le Développement (OECD). Elle décrit comment l'étude de l'apprentissage permet d'intégrer les facteurs composant les environnements pédagogiques novateurs. Elle analyse en outre les conditions critiques qui soutiennent son développement dans les organisations scolaires et les systèmes d'éducation.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric C.K. Cheng & Mun Ling Lo, 2013. "Learning Study: Its Origins, Operationalisation, and Implications," OECD Education Working Papers 94, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:eduaab:94-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5k3wjp0s959p-en
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