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Regulatory Issues in Biosecurity




The management of biosecurity risks (risks to the production sector, to indigenous biodiversity, and to public health) involves the exercise of extensive regulatory powers both at the border and within New Zealand. This paper reviews the Biosecurity Act 1993, paying particular attention to its requirements for risk analysis and decision-making. These are generally of a high standard. Requirements at the border are significantly influenced by New Zealand’s trading obligations and opportunities. Requirements for domestic pest management strategies are elaborate but can be sidestepped. Cost recovery practices for biosecurity differ widely and have been controversial.

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Pinfield, 2001. "Regulatory Issues in Biosecurity," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/23, New Zealand Treasury.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzt:nztwps:01/23

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    biosecurity; pests; regulation; risk management; cost recovery;

    JEL classification:

    • H40 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - General
    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law


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