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The Economic and Social Costs of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias in Ireland: An Aggregate Analysis


  • Eamon O'Shea

    () (Department of Economics, National University of Ireland, Galway)


This paper describes the economic and social costs of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias in Ireland. To date there have been no Irish studies on the costs of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Given that the proportion of elderly people in Ireland is projected to increase over the next few years, and that the occurrence of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias increases exponentially with age, information on the cost of this disease will potentially be very beneficial to researchers and policymakers alike.

Suggested Citation

  • Eamon O'Shea, 1998. "The Economic and Social Costs of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias in Ireland: An Aggregate Analysis," Working Papers 25, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 1998.
  • Handle: RePEc:nig:wpaper:0025

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior


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