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Retail Prices and Facility-Based Entry into the Telecommunications Market




There is growing sentiment that rate rebalancing to eliminate cross subsidies between local business and local residential telephone markets is necessary to induce efficient entry in the residential market. If the elasticity of supply with respect to the relative prices for business and residential local service is high in both the local business and local residential markets, then the efficiency gains from rebalancing may be large. Alternatively, other factors related to differences in characteristics between business and residential local telephone markets, such as lower costs, lower elasticity of demand, and greater willingness-to-pay for quality or redundancy in the business segment of local telephone may be more important determinants of entry. In this paper we simultaneously measure the elasticity of supply in the business market with regards to the price of business services relative to the price of residential service, using entry, economic and demographic data a the wire center level. We find that business entry is driven by market demand and cost characteristics, and that the effect of cross subsidies in prices on entry is less clear.

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  • David Gabel & Carolyn Gideon, 2005. "Retail Prices and Facility-Based Entry into the Telecommunications Market," Working Papers 05-15, NET Institute, revised Oct 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:net:wpaper:0515

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lukasz Grzybowski & Pedro Pereira, 2006. "Simulation of Merger in Mobile Telephony in Portugal," Working Papers 06-22, NET Institute, revised Oct 2006.
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    4. Okada, Yosuke & Hatta, Keiko, 1999. "The Interdependent Telecommunications Demand and Efficient Price Structure," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 311-335, December.
    5. Nevo, Aviv, 2001. "Measuring Market Power in the Ready-to-Eat Cereal Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(2), pages 307-342, March.
    6. Rodini, Mark & Ward, Michael R. & Woroch, Glenn A., 0. "Going mobile: substitutability between fixed and mobile access," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(5-6), pages 457-476, June.
    7. Steven T. Berry, 1994. "Estimating Discrete-Choice Models of Product Differentiation," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 25(2), pages 242-262, Summer.
    8. Ahn, Hyungtaik & Lee, Myeong-Ho, 1999. "An econometric analysis of the demand for access to mobile telephone networks," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 297-305, September.
    9. Gruber, Harald & Verboven, Frank, 2001. "The diffusion of mobile telecommunications services in the European Union," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 577-588, March.
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