IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/2075.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

How Integrated are World Capital Markets? Some New Tests

Author

Listed:
  • Maurice Obstfeld

Abstract

This paper present some new empirical evidence on the extent of world capital-market integration. The first set of tests carried out uses data from different countries to compare internationally expected marginal rates of substitution between consumption on different dates. If residents of different countries have access to a nominally risk-free bond denominated in dollars, say, their common expected marginal rate of substitution of future for present dollars should equal the gross nominal return on dollar bonds. Tests of the international equality of expected marginal substitution rates yield evidence consistent with a substantial degree of international capital-market integration after, but not before, 1973. These tests are naturally based on a particular model of intertemporal consumption choice, but direct estimation of the inter-country relationships implied by that model lends support to its assumptions. These last findings are relevant to the current debate in macroeconomics about the role of intertemporal substitution. The second set of tests conducted in this paper concerns correlations between countries' saving and investment rates. For a sample often countries, correlations between annual changes in saving and investment rates over the period 1948-1984 look quite similar to those found in quarterly data. Surprisingly, however, the correlation coefficients are often lower before the mid-1960s than afterward This finding throws further doubt on the interpretation of saving-investment correlation coefficients as structural parameters reflecting the response of domestic investment to shifts in national saving.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurice Obstfeld, 1986. "How Integrated are World Capital Markets? Some New Tests," NBER Working Papers 2075, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:2075
    Note: ITI IFM
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w2075.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Karen K. Lewis, 1995. "What Can Explain the Apparent Lack of International Consumption Risk Sharing?," NBER Working Papers 5203, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kollmann, Robert, 1995. "Consumption, real exchange rates and the structure of international asset markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 191-211, April.
    3. Jan Lemmen & Sylvester Eijffinger, 1995. "The quantity approach to financial integration: The Feldstein-Horioka criterion revisited," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 145-165, April.
    4. Golub, Stephen S., 1994. "International diversification of social and private risk: the U.S. and Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 263-284, October.
    5. Jorge Selaive & Vicente Tuesta, 2003. "Net foreign assets and imperfect pass-through: the consumption real exchange rate anomaly," International Finance Discussion Papers 764, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Maurice Obstfeld., 1993. "Are Industrial-Country Consumption Risks Globally Diversified?," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C93-014, University of California at Berkeley.
    7. Philip R. Lane, 2000. "International Diversification and the Irish Economy," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 31(1), pages 37-53.
    8. Lindberg, Sara, 1999. "Consumption and Capital Mobility in the Nordic Countries," Working Paper Series 1999:6, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    9. Predrag Petrović, 2016. "Backus–Smith puzzle and the European Union: It’s not just the nominal exchange rate," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 34(2), pages 393-418.
    10. Nouriel Roubini, 1988. "Current Account and Budget Deficits in an Intertemporal Model of Consumption and Taxation Smoothing. A Solution to the "Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle"?," NBER Working Papers 2773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Mamingi, Nlandu, 1997. "Saving-investment correlations and capital mobility: The experience of developing countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 605-626, December.
    12. Jorge Selaive & Vicente Tuesta, 2003. "Net Foreign Assets And Imperfect Financial Integration: An Empirical Approach," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 252, Central Bank of Chile.
    13. Sulimierska, Malgorzata, 2016. "The impact of capital account liberalisation on productivity growth: the evidence from Poland since 1995," Economics PhD Theses 1216, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    14. Faruk Balli & F.M. Pericoli & E. Pierucci, 2015. "Channels of risk-sharing at a micro level: savings, investments and the risk aversion heterogeneity," CAMA Working Papers 2015-01, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    15. Heinemann, Friedrich & Schüler, Martin, 2002. "How integrated are the European retail financial markets? A cointegration analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 02-22, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    16. Shibata, Akihisa & Shintani, Mototsugu, 1998. "Capital mobility in the world economy: an alternative test," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 741-756, October.
    17. Adrian Blundell-Wignall & Frank Browne, 1992. "Real Exchange Rates and the Globalisation of Financial Markets," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp9203, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    18. Alberto Alesina & Vittorio Grilli & Gian Maria Milesi-Ferrett, 1993. "The Political Economy of Capital Controls," NBER Working Papers 4353, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. A. Scorcu, 1997. "Contiguita' territoriale e shock sul consumo nelle regioni italiane," Working Papers 277, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    20. Huang, Chao-Hsi, 2010. "International capital mobility: An alternative test based on intertemporal current account models," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 467-482, June.
    21. Kim, H. Youn, 2014. "International financial integration and risk sharing among countries: A production-based approach," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 16-35.
    22. Lai, Jennifer T. & McNelis, Paul D. & Yan, Isabel K.M., 2013. "Regional capital mobility in China: Economic reform with limited financial integration," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 493-503.
    23. Evans, Paul & Karras, Georgios, 1997. "International integration of capital markets and the cross-country divergence of per capita consumption," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 681-697, September.
    24. Bernard Dumas, 1993. "Partial- Vs. General-Equilibrium Models of the International Capital Market," NBER Working Papers 4446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:2075. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () or (Joanne Lustig). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.