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Inter-Regional Migration in Australia: an Applied Economic Analysis


  • Fry, J.
  • Fry, T.R.L.
  • Peter, M.W.


In analysing the effects of economic policy in a Federal system, such as Australia, it is important to understand the interactions between the States and Territories. In particular, given that there is free movement between labour markets, to analyse economic policy it is important to understand the factors influencing inter- regional migration. In this paper we use data from 1982 to 1996 to estimate a structural econometric model of inter-regional migration. The results are then used to re-specify and calibrate the Computable General Equilibrium model MONASH-MRF. This then provides a more detailed picture of labour market responses when we subsequently simulate the response of net interstate migration to changes in State Government spending.

Suggested Citation

  • Fry, J. & Fry, T.R.L. & Peter, M.W., 1999. "Inter-Regional Migration in Australia: an Applied Economic Analysis," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 5/99, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:msh:ebswps:1999-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hyndman, R.J. & Yao, Q., 1998. "Nonparametric Estimation and Symmetry Tests for Conditional Density Functions," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 17/98, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    2. Grunwald, Gary K. & Hyndman, Rob J., 1998. "Smoothing non-Gaussian time series with autoregressive structure," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 171-191, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giesecke, James A. & Madden, John R., 2013. "Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    2. David C Maré & Wai Kin Choy, 2001. "Regional Labour Market Adjustment and the Movements of People: A Review," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/08, New Zealand Treasury.
    3. Ernest Miguélez & Rosina Moreno, 2014. "What Attracts Knowledge Workers? The Role Of Space And Social Networks," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 33-60, January.

    More about this item


    CGE models; Migration; MONASH-MRF.;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods

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