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The Benefits of Environmental Improvement: Estimates From Space-time Analysis


  • Carruthers, John I

    () (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development)

  • Clark, David

    () (Department of Economics Marquette University)

  • Renner, Robert N

    () (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development)


This paper develops estimates of environmental improvement based on a two-stage hedonic price analysis of the single family housing market in the Puget Sound region of Washington State. The analysis — which focuses specifically on several EPA-designated environmental hazards and involves 226,918 transactions for 177,303 unique properties that took place between January 2001 and September 2009 — involves four steps: (i) ten hedonic price functions are estimated year-by-year, one for each year of the 2000s; (ii) the hedonic estimates are used to compute the marginal implicit price of distance from air release, superfund, and toxic release sites; (iii) the marginal implicit prices, which vary through time, are used to estimate a series of implicit demand functions describing the relationship between the price of distance and the quantity consumed; and, finally (iv) the demand estimates are compared to those obtained in other research and then used evaluate the potential scale of benefits associated with some basic environmental improvement scenarios. Overall, the analysis provides further evidence that it is possible to develop a structural model of implicit demand within a single housing market and suggests that the benefits of environmental improvement are substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • Carruthers, John I & Clark, David & Renner, Robert N, 2010. "The Benefits of Environmental Improvement: Estimates From Space-time Analysis," Working Papers and Research 2010-11, Marquette University, Center for Global and Economic Studies and Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrq:wpaper:2010-11

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Don Ross & Carla Sharp & Rudy E. Vuchinich & David Spurrett, 2008. "Midbrain Mutiny: The Picoeconomics and Neuroeconomics of Disordered Gambling: Economic Theory and Cognitive Science," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262182653, January.
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    7. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0020-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. John I. Carruthers & Gordon F. Mulligan, 2013. "Through the Crisis," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(2), pages 124-143, May.

    More about this item


    hedonic housing model; benefits; environmental improvement; Economics;

    JEL classification:

    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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