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Renewable energy consumption and economic growth in Indonesia. Evidence from the ARDL bounds testing approach

Author

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  • Hlalefang Khobai

    (Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University)

Abstract

This study serves to examine the effects of renewable energy consumption on economic growth in Indonesia. Quarterly time series data was used for the period 1990 – 2014. Applying the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) bounds testing approach, the study established that there is a long run relationship between economic growth, renewable energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, capital and employment. It is established that renewable energy consumption has a significant positive effect on economic growth both in the long run and short run. The findings from the vector error correction model (VECM) technique suggest that there is a long run causality flowing from renewable energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions, capital and employment to economic growth. The findings of this study suggest that the government, energy policy makers and associated bodies should act together to improve on the renewable energy infrastructure and lower carbon growth in Indonesia.

Suggested Citation

  • Hlalefang Khobai, 2018. "Renewable energy consumption and economic growth in Indonesia. Evidence from the ARDL bounds testing approach," Working Papers 1806, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Feb 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:mnd:wpaper:1806
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Renewable energy consumption; Economic growth; Co-integration; Causality; Indonesia.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development

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