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Developing Country Interests in the Forthcoming WTO Negotiations


  • Stern, R.M.


This paper reviews the main issues in the forthcoming WTO negotiations, including: a review of the accomplishments of the Uruguay Round and the multilateral negotiations that have since followed; identification and analysis of Uruguay Round built-in agenda issues and new issues that may possibly be considered in a new round; alternative negotiating modalities, including sectoral and broadly based negotiations and possible cross-issue linkages; dovetailing multilateral and regional negotiations; and interest-group alignments. In preparing for a new negotiating round, individual developing countries need to design with care their negotiating strategies and options. Countries have to decide what they want most to achieve from the negotiations and what they are willing to offer in return.

Suggested Citation

  • Stern, R.M., 2000. "Developing Country Interests in the Forthcoming WTO Negotiations," Working Papers 456, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:mie:wpaper:456

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item



    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade


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