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Rentner und Rentnerinnen im deutschen Sozialversicherungssystem: Beitragsleistungen und Leistungsbezug


  • Gasche, Martin

    () (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))


Rentner sind zum einen Empfänger von Rentenzahlungen sowie von Kranken- und Pflegeversicherungsleistungen. Zum anderen sind sie aber auch Beitragszahler in der Kranken- und Pflegeversicherung. Sie finanzieren also einen Teil der von ihnen verursachten Ausgaben selbst. In dieser Studie werden die verschiedenen Rentenarten (Altersrenten, Erwerbsminderungsrenten sowie Witwer- und Witwenrenten) und hinsichtlich einiger Eigenschaften wie der Altersstruktur der Rentenbezieher, der Einkommensstruktur oder der Einkommensverteilung näher betrachtet. Es werden die von den Rentnern in einem Jahr aufgebrachten Sozialversicherungsbeiträge und die von ihnen gleichzeitig verursachten Ausgaben altersspezifisch und geschlechtsspezifisch ermittelt. Dabei lässt sich feststellen, dass in der Gesetzlichen Krankenversicherung die Beiträge der Rentner/innen im Durchschnitt schon ab einem Alter von 45 Jahren nicht mehr ausreichen, um die verursachten Ausgaben zu decken. In der Sozialen Pflegeversicherung können die Rentner noch bis zu einem Alter von 70 Jahren die von ihnen verursachten Kosten durch eigene Beiträge finanzieren. Mit zunehmendem Alter steigt der negative Nettobeitrag jedoch stark an. Dabei macht der Nettobeitrag je Rentner der Männer nur zwei Drittel des Nettobeitrags der Frauen aus. Die Gegenüberstellung der Summe von Beiträgen und Leistungen zeigt, dass die Rentner mit ihren Beitragszahlungen in der Gesetzlichen Krankenversicherung 44% der verursachten Kosten decken und in der Sozialen Pflegeversicherung 27%.

Suggested Citation

  • Gasche, Martin, 2010. "Rentner und Rentnerinnen im deutschen Sozialversicherungssystem: Beitragsleistungen und Leistungsbezug," MEA discussion paper series 10203, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:10203

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    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions

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