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How Can We Prevent Violence Becoming a Viable Political Strategy?

Author

Listed:
  • Patricia Justino

    () (Institute of Development Studies)

Abstract

A basic issue that conflict analysis investigates is how non-peaceful ways of living and governing become viable political strategies. Macro-level studies provide some important insights but micro-level analysis is vital to understand the mechanisms that make violence possible. This briefing outlines some preliminary findings in this respect from MICROCON, a major research programme analysing violent conflict at the micro level. It also discusses their implications for policies aimed at preventing the (re-)eruption of violent confl icts. An important overall insight is the variety and combination of motives involved in each case. Given this complexity, policy strategies need to be based on a micro-level appreciation of people's strategies for coping with vulnerabilities to both poverty and violence.

Suggested Citation

  • Patricia Justino, 2009. "How Can We Prevent Violence Becoming a Viable Political Strategy?," Policy Briefings 5, MICROCON - A Micro Level Analysis of Violent Conflict.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcn:polbrf:5
    as

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    File URL: http://www.microconflict.eu/publications/PB5_PJ.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
    Download Restriction: no

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Violent Conflict; peace building;

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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