IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Foreword

Listed author(s):
  • Sinn, Hans-Werner

World economic growth faced a number of fresh challenges in 2015, including the decline in oil and commodity prices, the slowdown in emerging market economies, and an initial interest rate hike by the US Federal Reserve System. Despite the turmoil, the European economy continued to recover, although the improvement remains weak and fragile, with yet another flare-up of the euro crisis in Greece. The EEAG scholars, focusing on the future, pose the question of What next? As is its tradition, the 2016 EEAG Report begins with an analysis of the business cycle situation in the major economies around the world, including a forecast for this year. Indepth chapters then delve into several topical issues. Chapter 2 addresses the demographic challenge faced by some EU countries, which is being exacerbated by labour mobility in the union, calling for a common solution to restore both cohesion between EU members and intergenerational fairness in society. Chapter 3 focuses on the need for tuning secondary education, a need starkly illustrated by the high levels of youth unemployment in Southern Europe. Practice-oriented dual education, standardised – and thus comparable – tests and greater coordination at the European level are all identified as key strategies. Chapter 4 offers an indepth analysis of the feasibility of taking Denmark as a role model for implementing political reforms effectively. Denmark, it turns out, is not too good to be true. Finally, Chapter 5 explores developments in the Western Balkan countries, which are in the process of coming together and seeking a sustainable relationship with the EU.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Paper provided by University of Munich, Department of Economics in its series Munich Reprints in Economics with number 19595.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: 2013
Publication status: Published in EEAG Report on the European Economy 2013(2013): pp. 1-2
Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19595
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Ludwigstr. 28, 80539 Munich, Germany

Phone: +49-(0)89-2180-3405
Fax: +49-(0)89-2180-3510
Web page: http://www.vwl.uni-muenchen.de

More information through EDIRC

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lmu:muenar:19595. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Tamilla Benkelberg)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.