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An economic review of the national screening policy to prevent thalassemia major in Iran


  • Nader Ghotbi

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)

  • Tsuneo Tsukatani

    () (Institute of Economic Research, Kyoto University)


This Paper is to describe the economic burden of thalassemia as a major health problem in thalassemia belt countries like Iran. Great emphasis is placed on prenatal diagnosis to prevent the disease, as the "economic" solution from a health care policy viewpoint. The alternative method of the current screening program in Iran is outlined and discussed especially with respect to the "cost-effectiveness" issue, along with some pitfalls of the general plan and the techniques under use. Further follow-up of program after such refinement is advised, and especially the provision of a working option of prenatal diagnosis to carrier couples is recommended.

Suggested Citation

  • Nader Ghotbi & Tsuneo Tsukatani, 2002. "An economic review of the national screening policy to prevent thalassemia major in Iran," KIER Working Papers 562, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:562

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    References listed on IDEAS

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