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Modelling commodity demands and labour supply with m-demands

Author

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  • Martin Browning

    (Institute of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

In the empirical modelling of demands and labour supply we often lack data on a full set of goods. The usual response is to invoke separability assumptions. Here we present an alternative based on modelling demands as a function of prices and the quantity of a reference good rather than total expenditure. We term such demands m-demands. The advantage of this approach is that we make maximum use of the data to hand without invoking implausible separability assumptions. In the theory section quasi-Slutsky conditions are derived and some structural and separability conditions are presented. We also derive functional forms for empirical work. Finally an empirical illustration on Canadian expenditure data is given. This illustrates both the implementation of the ideas presented in the theory section and the empirical costs of not having a full set of data.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Browning, 1998. "Modelling commodity demands and labour supply with m-demands," Discussion Papers 99-08, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:9908
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/1999/9908.pdf/
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    Cited by:

    1. Sonia Bhalotra & Christopher Heady, 2003. "Child Farm Labor: The Wealth Paradox," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 197-227, December.
    2. Olivier Donni & Nicolas Moreau, 2007. "Collective Labor Supply: A Single-Equation Model and Some Evidence from French Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    3. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Marie D. Connolly & Christopher Worswick, 2000. "Does the Family Investment Hypothesis Explain Immigrant Labor Market Activity?," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0828, Econometric Society.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumer demands; labour supply; Slutsky conditions;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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